Tag Archives: dry white wine

Cooking For Two


I would like to introduce you today to a new recipe I tried years ago in my beloved city, London. I got it from the book “Cooking for two”, published in 1996. What a reasonable title! And what a perfect day to cook, at the end of the week. Imagine yourself tired from the week. You don’t feel like looking at all. May be not a very difficult recipe. You would love some eggs too. Hmmm…ah…there is it…

Souffle omelette with mushroom sauce

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 1 tbsp water
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh tarragon
  • 20 g butter (lovely butter…)

For the mushroom sauce

  • 60 g butter
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 125 g baby mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 tsp plain flour
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 tsp French mustard
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh tarragon

Method:

  • Whisk egg yolks, water and tarragon in a large bowl until well combined.
  • Beat egg whites in a small bowl with electric mixer until soft peaks form.
  • Fold egg whites gently into egg yolk mixture in 2 batches.
  • Heat half the butter in the omelette pan. Pour the half egg mixture into pan, cook omelette until lightly browned underneath.
  • Place the pan under a hot grill until top of the omelette is just set.
  • Slide the omelette onto plate, fold omelette in half, spoon over half the mushrooms sauce.
  • Repeat with remaining butter, egg mixture and sauce.
  • Mushroom sauce: heat the butter in a pan, add onion, garlic and mushrooms, cook stirring, until onion is soft. Add flour, cook stirring, until combined.
  • Remove from heat, gradually stir in combined remaining ingredients, stir over heat until mixture boils and thickens. If you like to ease your work, you can make the sauce a day ahead.

Bon appetite, my love!

 

An Ode To Peaches


I was thinking  of this title and it came to me to search on the internet. And I found a poem name like this that I think it describes perfectly the feeling one goes through, while eating a peach. Click An Ode To Peaches and see what I am talking about.

And coming back to the recipe, here are a few words about it. It is a Bulgarian recipe from “The Practical Encyclopedia of Easteuropean Cooking” 1999 and it is delicious and fun to make. The contrast between the hot peach and cold whipped cream awakens your senses. This reminds me of Poires Belle Helene, where you also have a similar texture, with cold cream and ice-cream and warm peaches. If you like cold peaches than it is a healthier alternative of an ice-cream on a hot summer day.

Baked Peaches

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 40 g (1 1/2 oz, 3 tbsp) unsalted butter
  • 6 firm ripe peaches, washed
  • 12 whole cloves
  • 90 g (3 1/2 oz, 1/2 cup) vanilla sugar
  • 45 ml (3 tbsp) brandy or dry white wine (optional)
  • pistachios, mint leaves and a little sifted icing sugar, to decorate
  • whipped cream, to serve

Method:

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C, 350°F, Gas Mark 4. Spread half the butter around an ovenproof dish, making sure both side and base are well coated.
  • Halve the peaches and remove the stones. Place the peaches skin side down in the dish. Push a whole clove into the center of each peach half.
  • Sprinkle with the sugar and dot the remaining butter into each peach half. Drizzle over the brandy or wine, if using. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the peaches are tender.
  • Serve the peaches, hot or cold, with freshly whipped cream, pistachio nuts and sprigs of mint and sprinkle with a little icing sugar.

Bon appetite!

Chicken Veronique


I remember that I have made this recipe for the first and only time in London, when we were waiting for a guest. This chicken Veronique seemed tasty, exquisite and elegant for a party. And it proved it was. I found it in “Good Housekeeping All Colour Party Cookbook” 1992. I really love this recipe. It is fit for a king and I would eat it often. If you really want to make an impression on somebody, try this out for a romantic dinner or not. And prepare your nose and your tongue for an indulgence. Because you’re worth it!

Chicken Veronique

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 50 g (2 oz) butter
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh tarragon (or 2 tsp dried tarragon)
  • finely grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 1 garlic clove, skinned and crushed
  • 1,5 kg (3 lb) chicken
  • 300 ml (1/2 pint) chicken stock (or water, but it won’t taste the same)
  • 150 ml (1/4 pint) dry white wine
  • 150 ml (5 fl oz) double cream
  • 175 g (6 oz) green grapes, halved and seeded
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper

Method:

  • Soften the butter in a bowl with the tarragon, lemon rind, garlic and salt and pepper to taste. Put half the mixture in the cavity of the bird.
  • Truss the chicken with the thread or fine string. Spread the remainder of the mixture over the outside of the bird (especially the legs), then stand on a rack in a roasting tin. Pour the chicken stock under the rack.
  • Roast the chicken in the oven at 200°C/ 400°F, Gas Mark 6 for about 1 1/4 hours or until the juices run clear when the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with a skewer. Turn the bird and baste every 15 minutes or so during roasting.
  • Carve the chicken into neat portions, then arrange on a warmed serving platter, cover and keep warm.
  • Make the sauce. Blot off any excess fat from the roasting tin with absorbent  kitchen paper, then place the tin on top of the cooker. Pour the wine, then boil to reduce to about half the original volume, stirring and scraping the tin to dislodge sediment.
  • Stir in the cream and continue simmering and stirring until thick, smooth and glossy. Add the grapes and heat through, then taste and adjust seasoning.
  • Pour a little of the sauce over the chicken, arranging the grapes as attractively as possible on each portion. Serve immediately, with the remaining sauce and grapes handed separately in a sauceboat, accompanied by crisply cooked mange-touts or French beans and a simple dish of plain boiled rice. Don’t forget about a chilled dry white wine. 🙂

Bon appetite!